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Task Knives

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    • $65$170

Fish & Fillet Knives

14 products available

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Classic 5" Boning Knife

$115.00
 
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Gourmet 8" Flexible Fish Fillet Knife

$95.00
 
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Gourmet 6" Flexible Fillet Knife

$70.00
 
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Classic 8" Flexible Fish Fillet Knife

$120.00
 
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Classic 6" Flexible Fish Fillet Knife

$105.00
 
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Classic 6" Fillet Knife

$120.00
 
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Classic Ikon 5" Boning Knife

$160.00
 
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Classic Ikon 5" Boning Knife

$160.00
 
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Gourmet 11" Hollow Edge Salmon Slicer

$95.00
 
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Classic Ikon 7" Fillet Knife

$170.00
 
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Classic 7" Fillet Knife

$135.00
 
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Gourmet 5" Boning Knife

$65.00
 
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Classic 6" Flexible Boning Knife

Currently Unavailable
 
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Gourmet 6" Flexible Boning Knife

Currently Unavailable
 

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Task Knives

    Filter By:

    • $65$170

    What angle is a fish fillet knife?

    WÜSTHOF’s fish fillet knife features a narrow, flexible, straight-edge blade with a 14.5° angle on each side for superior sharpness.

    Can you use a serrated knife to fillet a fish?

    No, sorry! (Well, you can, though we wouldn’t recommend it.) When it comes to the best knives for cutting, scaling, boning, or skinning fish, try a slim, narrow, straight-edge blade with a pointed tip and a hint of flexibility, like one of our fillet knives or flexible fish fillet knives. (Sometimes you might hear these knives referred to as “seafood knives,” though they’re primarily designed for whole fish and fillets as opposed to, say, oysters or crab.) Knives like these offer precise cuts without pulling or tearing the delicate skin or flesh.

    What is the best process for cutting fish?

    Whether you’re preparing crispy skin-on fillets, scaling and skinning a side of salmon, making wafer-thin slices for sushi or crudo, or stuffing a whole fish with aromatics before roasting, the best process for preparing fish starts with the right tools. A sharp, agile fish knife or fillet knife are the best blades for cutting fish. From there, the world is your oyster!